member since August 16, 2010
profile picture

portfolio of
Charlie Visnic

Line Sketch

The idea began with the interest in making a “for” loop which would, when mouse pressed, create a series of circles each 10 pixels larger than the next. I had trouble making it work in time. What would end up happening is I would press the mouse and instantly all the circles would appear at once rather than one after the other. That’s when I hit the reference material and found a function called “millus”. Millus stands for milliseconds and it allows you to trigger code at any point within time. It took a little finagling to get it to work but thanks to the Learning Processing book it even

Rectangular Sketch

The idea began with the interest in making a “for” loop which would, when mouse pressed, create a series of circles each 10 pixels larger than the next. I had trouble making it work in time. What would end up happening is I would press the mouse and instantly all the circles would appear at once rather than one after the other. That’s when I hit the reference material and found a function called “millus”. Millus stands for milliseconds and it allows you to trigger code at any point within time. It took a little finagling to get it to work but thanks to the Learning Processing book it even

Circular Sketch

The idea began with the interest in making a “for” loop which would, when mouse pressed, create a series of circles each 10 pixels larger than the next. I had trouble making it work in time. What would end up happening is I would press the mouse and instantly all the circles would appear at once rather than one after the other. That’s when I hit the reference material and found a function called “millus”. Millus stands for milliseconds and it allows you to trigger code at any point within time. It took a little finagling to get it to work but thanks to the Learning Processing book it even

Day 165 / Learning From Others

I was so sleepy from my late night at work the previous night that I could hardly read my "Learning Processing" book. I wanted to get through another chapter but I couldn't seem to retain anything. So, I turned to the website Open Processing which is a place that hosts processing sketches. It's pretty fun to browse other peoples sketches to see what can be done with Processing. A few days ago while I was browsing I came across Caroline Kassimo Zahnd's sketches and in particular this beautiful sketch. If you study her sketches you can see how she has taken one simple code and revised it an

Playing with Random()

This time I took the example for Random() from the Processing website and added my own spin to it. I added mouse and keyboard functionality. I added the draw() function to make it a continuos sketch. Then I just went to town on the Random() function. I added it wherever I could think of it. Eventually, I tweaked it into a place I thought was visually pleasing.

Day 160 / Back Into Processing

I decided last night to go back to my reading. I decided to make a variation on the drawing a continuous line program. I added some control functionality. If you click and drag in the square below you will see rectangles appear. The faster you drag left and right the larger the rectangles will be. If you press “a” you’ll get a color, press “s” for a second color, “d” for a third color and “f” for a transparent rectangle. Finally, press “z” to clear and begin again.
followed by
0
following
0

collections and classrooms

not contributed to any collections or classrooms yet.

favorites

Share Share Subscribe to sketches